Why Is a Missouri Senate Candidate Issuing ‘RINO Hunting Permits’?

Well the Doc opened up the old mailbag today and here’s what poured out.

Dear Dr. Ads,

There I was, minding my own business and checking out CNN’s Reliable Sources nightly newsletter, when I came across this item.

Wait, what? This guy is encouraging Missouri voters to hunt down Republicans who aren’t MAGAts? This is really a most dangerous game – don’t you think, Doc?

– Rinoblasty

Dear Rinoblasty,

Yeah – Eric Greitens: rhymes with frightens.

Here’s the ad.

Not surprisingly, the spot has gone over like the metric system in normie circles, as the Reliable Sources newsletter noted.

Missouri news outlets did not mince words about Monday’s new campaign video from Republican U.S. Senate candidate Eric Greitens. “Gun-wielding Greitens releases violent ad targeting other Republicans,” the St. Louis Post-Dispatch said. An article by the Kansas City Star was even more blunt, calling it “Greitens’ people-hunting video.”  . . .

Greitens is not a fringe candidate. He is the disgraced former governor of the state. As Jake Tapper said on CNN, “You would think a candidate who has been accused of spousal and child abuse by his ex-wife… might consider a less violent appeal to voters.” His guest S.E. Cupp pointed out that Greitens is “leaning in” to the controversy, “very smugly promoting it,” even though the ad is “crazy, creepy and chilling.”

As the Doc has chronicled on several occasions, fondling firearms is now the two-drink minimum for red-state GOP candidates (see here and here). Greitens, however, is taking the gun gambit to a new, and lethal, low.

Remarkably, there’s nothing local broadcasters can do to stop him, given federal regulation of the public airwaves. This piece by Jerry Carnes at Fox54 provides details.

When it comes to qualified candidates who are on the ballot for federal office, television stations can not refuse their ads for any reason, including content.

According to Federal Communications Commission laws, stations can’t edit or censor.

“They have to take that ad, and the network is not liable for airing that even if it’s potentially slanderous or libelous,” explains Joseph Watson, Professor of Public Affairs Communications, Advertising & Public Relations at the University of Georgia’s Grady School of Journalism.

Slanderous, libelous . . . or murderous, apparently.

Greg Greitens is the GOP’s ultimate Accessory Before the Fact. But we’re guessing he’s not the only GOP candidate who’ll trigger some Squid Games karma before the 2022 elections are over.

Was Biting Evander Holyfield’s Ear Really Mike Tyson’s ‘Most Notorious Moment’?

Well the Doc opened up the old mailbag today and here’s what poured out.

Dear Dr. Ads,

There I was, minding my own business and scrolling through Ad Age’s Media Buzz when, I came across this piece by E.J. Schultz.

MIKE TYSON POISED TO GROW ‘MIKE BITES’ CANNABIS BRAND THAT RECALLS EAR-BITING INCIDENT

Mike Tyson seems intent on building a brand around one of the most infamous moments of his career—when he took a bite of Evander Holyfield’s ear in a boxing match 25 years ago. Tyson’s cannabis brand recently came out with ear-shaped marijuana edibles, called Mike Bites. And now a trademark filing indicates the boxing legend wants to expand the brand into a range of products, including keychains, pillows, rolling papers, vape pens and more.

What the hell, Doc? Is this guy high on his own supply?

– Ivonder

Dear Ivonder,

First off, let’s look at that “most infamous moment” of Mike Tyson’s monumentally infamous career.

Granted, that was decidedly not Tyson’s finest hour, but in no way does it eclipse his 1992 conviction for raping 18-year-old Desiree Washington in an Indianapolis hotel room.

(Just FYI: Tyson’s highest-profile defender at the time was – wait for it – one Donald J. Trump.)

Regardless of all that, a couple of months ago Tyson launched Mike Bites, as CNN’s Zoe Sottile reported.

Mike Tyson is selling ear-shaped cannabis-infused edibles called ‘Mike Bites’

(CNN) – More than two decades after Mike Tyson bit off a chunk of Evander Holyfield’s ear at the 1997 WBA Heavyweight Championship fight, the legendary boxer has released a line of edibles — in the shape of ears.

The cannabis-infused gummies are called “Mike Bites” in homage to Tyson’s most notorious moment.

Again – not Tyson’s most notorious moment. Rape is way worse than ear-biting, yes?

Anyway, also from the CNN piece: “Tyson hasn’t been shy about his strong relationship with cannabis. The former heavyweight champion admitted in 2019 that he spends $40,000 a month on weed at his 40-acre cannabis ranch.”

That’s almost half a million dollars a year up in smoke. How many gummies would you have to sell to feed that habit?

Then again, not everyone has found Mike Bites palatable, as Matt Audilet noted last month in The Spun.

Tyson’s product is already on sale in California and his company, Tyson 2.0, has plans to expand to other states around the country. But, one state has already outlawed the “ear shaped” gummies. “Mike Bites” aren’t able to hit the shelves in Colorado because of a law against selling “human-shaped” edibles.

Tyson’s fans, according to Audilet’s piece, bit back at the ban: “The sports world took to Twitter to react to this news. ‘Boooooooooooo. Let the people eat Eardibles,’ one wrote. ‘This just keeps getting funnier with each new word you read,’ another added.”

The Doc doesn’t think that anything about Mike Tyson is in any way funny. (You can see his latest spasm of violence here.)

But maybe that’s just the Do No Harmist in us.